Quick Facts

  • Awards

    2 Awards

  • Patients' Choice Award Patients' Choice Award
  • Regional Top Doctors Regional Top Doctors
  • Accepted Insurance

  • United Healthcare
  • BCBS Blue Card
  • Cigna
  • Humana
  • Aetna

Doctors in Conemaugh Memorial Medical

View all physicians that belong to Conemaugh Memorial Medical.

Ratings & Comments

55 ratings with 13 comments

The Overall Average Patient Rating of Conemaugh Memorial Medical when asked is excellent. Conemaugh Memorial Medical has been reviewed by 55 patients. The rating is 4.0 out of 5 stars.

The average wait time to see a doctor at Conemaugh Memorial Medical as provided by patient reviews is 22 minutes. By comparison, the national average for a pre-vist wait time is 21 minutes.


13 specialties

  • Internal Medicine

    An internist is a physician who focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of conditions that affect the adult population—both acute and chronic.
    These doctors are often who adults see as their primary physicians because they treat a broad range of illnesses that do not require surgical or specialist interventions. They also work to help a patient maintain optimal health in order to prevent the onset of disease.
    In addition to treating the common cold and flu, internists also treat chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease.

  • Nephrology

    A nephrologist is a physician who is specially trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the kidneys or renal system.
    A nephrologist will determine through urine analysis, blood test, X-ray, sonogram, or kidney biopsy how well the kidneys are functioning and will then prescribe a special diet and exercise program, medication or dialysis - a process by which a machine filters the blood when the kidney is no longer capable of doing so.

  • Emergency Medicine

    An emergency physician is a doctor who is an expert in handling conditions of an urgent and extremely dangerous nature. These specialists work in the emergency room (ER) departments of hospitals where they oversee cases involving cardiac distress, trauma, fractures, lacerations and other acute conditions.
    Emergency physicians are specially trained to make urgent life-saving decisions to treat patients during an emergency medical crisis. These doctors diagnose and stabilize patients before they are either well enough to be discharged, or transferred to the appropriate department for long-term care.

  • Pulmonary Disease

    A pulmonologist is a physician who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of conditions related to the lungs and respiratory tract.
    These specialists are similar to critical care specialists in that their patients often require mechanical ventilation to assist their breathing.
    Pulmonologists diagnose and treat patients with conditions such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, asbestosis, pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancer, COPD, and emphysema. Exposure and inhalation of certain toxic substances may also warrant the services of a pulmonologist.
    Some of the tools and tests pulmonologists use to diagnose a patient are a stethoscope in order to listen for abnormal breathing sounds, chest X-rays, CT scans, blood tests, bronchoscopy, and polysomnography.

  • General Practice

    A general practitioner is similar to a family practitioner in that they treat patients of all ages with a variety of health concerns. These doctors treat everyday ailments, some acute and chronic diseases, and also provid health checkups, physicals, inoculations and preventative care.
    General practitioners differ from family practitioners because they are not required to complete an additional residency in family medicine after completing their medical school residency. Like family practitioners, general practitioners will also provide referrals to patients who are in need of a specialist.

  • Infectious Disease

    An infectious disease specialist has specialized training in the diagnosis and treatment of contagious diseases.
    Infectious diseases, also known as contagious or transmissible diseases, are those that stem from pathogen from a host organism. These infections may spread to other carriers through physical touch, airborne inhalation, bodily fluids or contaminated foods.
    Infectious disease specialists identify whether the disease is caused by bacteria, a virus, a fungus or a parasite often through blood tests and then determine what course of treatment, if any, is necessary.

  • Neurology

    A neurologist is a physician who diagnoses and treats disorders of the nervous system which is comprised of the brain, spinal cord and nerves. These doctors do not perform surgery, but refer patients to neurological surgeons when they determine that surgical intervention is necessary.
    Some of the conditions that neurologists diagnose and treat are epilepsy, aneurysms, hydrocephalus, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, spinal disc herniation, and spinal disease.
    In addition to using diagnostic tests like MRI, CT scans, EEG and EMG, neurologists also employ neurological testing to gauge muscle strength and movement, balance, reflexes, sensation, memory, speech, and other cognitive abilities.

  • Hospitalist

    Hospitalists are physicians who specialize in the care of patients in the hospital. The majority of hospitalists are board-certified internists and have completed the same training as other internal medicine doctors including medical school, residency and board certification examination.
    Hospitalist activities include patient care, teaching, research, and leadership related to hospital care. They have more expertise in caring for complicated hospitalized patients on a daily basis since, unlike other specialists or primary care doctors, they spend most of their day in the hospital.
    They often coordinate the care of their patients and act as the central point of communication among the different doctors and nurses involved in the patient's care. They are also the main physician for family members to contact for updates on a loved one.

  • General Surgery

    A surgical specialist is a physician who has additional training in a specific area of surgery.
    The American Board of Medical Specialties acknowledges the following surgical specialties: general surgery, thoracic and cardiac surgery, colon and rectal surgery, obstetrics and gynecological surgery, neurological surgery, ophthalmic surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthopedic surgery, otolaryngological surgery, pediatric surgery, plastic surgery, urological surgery, and vascular surgery.
    Some procedures are performed by more than one type of specialist. Also, some surgeons may choose to specialize in specific procedures within their specialty area. For example, a plastic and maxillofacial surgeon may specialize in performing rhinoplasty procedures.

  • Critical Care Medicine

    Also sometimes referred to as intensivists, critical care specialists are physicians with specialized training in the diagnosis and management of life-threatening conditions. Some of these conditions affect vital organs like the heart and lungs, those that make breathing difficult or impossible, and those that affect entire organ systems, like the renal system.
    Critical care specialists are typically found in a hospital's intensive care unit where they monitor patients with life-threatening conditions and make determinations as to the best course of treatment.

  • Rheumatology

    A rheumatologist is a physician who has received extensive training in diagnosing and treating rheumatic conditions. Rheumatic conditions involve the joints, soft tissues, autoimmune system, vascular system, and connective tissues.
    Some of the conditions that rheumatologists treat are rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, gout, sarcoidosis, vasculitis, and lupus. These are all conditions that involve a lot of pain and make mobility difficult. Rheumatologists use medications, such as analgesics, NSAIDs, steroids, DMARDs, infliximab, and adalimumab, as well as occupational therapy, in order to decrease pain and improve a patient's quality of life.

  • Vascular Surgery

    Vascular surgeons treat and manage disorders in your veins, arteries and your lymphatic system to ensure blood circulation in your heart and in brain is the best it can be. They're well-versed on how your vascular system works with the rest of your body and they can treat conditions that may cause blockages or buildup.
    They can perform many of the same diagnostic testing as interventional radiologists can, such as angiography and MRIs. In addition to diagnosis, they provide critical care and treatment for aneurysms, artery blockages and trauma injuries that involve your veins. They can also help patients manage diabetes, blood pressure and cholesterol as well as treat artery disease. Treatment for more serious cases might include bypass surgery or surgery to remove plaque.

  • Psychiatry

    A psychiatrist is a doctor with specific training in the diagnosis and treatment of mental illness.
    He or she can not only provide the counseling necessary to both diagnose and treat a patient, but can also prescribe medication when needed. In some cases, a psychiatrist will only provide the medication and the counseling will be provided by another healthcare specialist, like a certified counselor or psychologist.
    Like other doctors, psychiatrists employ diagnostic tools like CT scans and MRI in order to observe the structure and function of a patient's brain.
    Once a diagnosis is made, these specialists may use behavior or cognitive therapy in order to address the patient's condition, or a multitude of other types of therapy, in conjunction with or in place of medication.

  • Education

    Affiliated doctors have gone to the following schools

  • Michigan State University College Of Human Medicine
  • University Of Kansas School Of Medicine
  • University Of Aleppo
  • Adichunchanagiri Institute Of Medical Sciences
  • New York College Of Osteopathic Medicine
  • West Virginia University School Of Medicine
  • Johns Hopkins University School Of Medicine
  • Smt Nhl Municipal Medical College

Information About Group Practices

What is a Group Practice?

According to The Medical Group Management Association, a group practice is any relationship between three or more physicians who share facilities, expenses, profits and other resources like support staff and equipment. Group practices tend to fall into two categories: those that organize around a particular medical specialty and those that encompass several specialties like East Boston Neighborhood Health that specializes in internal medicine

Why Group Practice?

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.

Benefits of Group Practice

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.

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