Quick Facts

  • Awards

    9 Awards

  • Compassionate Doctor Recognition
  • Patients' Choice Award
  • Regional Top Doctors
  • On-Time Doctor Award
  • Patients' Choice 5th Anniversary Award
  • Top 10 Doctor - Metro Area
  • Top 10 Doctor - State
  • Top Doctors: New York Metro Area™
  • Compassionate Doctor Award - 5 Year Honoree
  • Accepted Insurance

  • BCBS Blue Card
  • Amerihealth
  • Highmark BCBS
  • United Healthcare
  • Aetna

Doctors in Abington Medical Specialists

View all physicians that belong to Abington Medical Specialists.

Ratings & Comments

396 ratings with 127 comments

The Overall Average Patient Rating of Abington Medical Specialists when asked is excellent. Abington Medical Specialists has been reviewed by 396 patients. The rating is 4.5 out of 5 stars.

The average wait time to see a doctor at Abington Medical Specialists as provided by patient reviews is 11 minutes. By comparison, the national average for a pre-vist wait time is 21 minutes.

Specialties

9 specialties

  • Internal Medicine

    An internist is a physician who focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of conditions that affect the adult population—both acute and chronic.
    These doctors are often who adults see as their primary physicians because they treat a broad range of illnesses that do not require surgical or specialist interventions. They also work to help a patient maintain optimal health in order to prevent the onset of disease.
    In addition to treating the common cold and flu, internists also treat chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease.

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology

    While cardiologists diagnose and treat all types of heart disease, electrophysiologists have extended education in rhythmic disorders, also known as cardiac arrhythmia or an irregular heartbeat. An electrophysiologist typically works closely with a cardiologist and together they can treat arrhythmia, help you prevent blood clots, or restore and control a normal heart rate.
    They can also provide information on medications and devices — such as a pacemaker or an implantable defibrillator — used to control an abnormal heart rate. When it come to treating arrhythmias, there are both invasive and non-invasive treatment options and an electrophysiologist can help you decide which is right for you.

  • Orthopedic Surgery

    An orthopaedic surgeon is a physician who specializes in diagnosis and surgical treatment of injuries and disorders involving the musculoskeletal system, such as hip replacements and arthroscopic knee surgery.
    In addition to treating trauma to the musculoskeletal system, these doctors also deal with sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

  • Orthopedics Reconstructive Surgery

    Orthopedic reconstructive surgeons deal with injuries and deformities of your bones and muscles. If you ever need a hip, knee or shoulder replacement — whether due to a sports injury or aging — an orthopedic surgeon will consult with you and answer any questions you have before scheduling an operation. After surgery, you’ll have a few checkups to ensure everything heals properly.
    In addition to shoulders, hips and knees, they deal with injuries everywhere from your ankles and feet to your elbows and hands — and even your spine. They also help treat birth defects related to bones and muscles as well as degenerative conditions like osteoporosis and muscular dystrophy.

  • Dermatology

    A dermatologist is a doctor who has extensive training and knowledge of the skin, scalp, hair and nails and treats conditions that affect those areas. These doctors will evaluate any abnormality, blemish or lesion on the skin in order to determine the cause and will determine a course of treatment.
    Dermatologists provide patients with full body scans in order to identify any signs that are indicative of an illness that requires treatment, such as skin cancer. These specialists may also provide cosmetic services, such as mole removal, scar diminishing treatments and even botox and face lifts.

  • Interventional Cardiology

    An interventional cardiologist has the same training as a cardiologist and they're well-versed in all types of heart disease and how to diagnose heart problems. The difference is that interventional cardiologists have additional expertise and training on specific interventional treatments for heart disease, such as angioplasties and stents. These methods use catheterization, which reduces recovery time as well as scarring after surgery.

  • Orthopedic Surgery of the Spine

    If you have a back injury or unexplained back pain, your doctor might refer you first to a radiologist and then to an orthopedic spinal surgeon. They specialize in the spine and can diagnose and treat spinal diseases such as scoliosis. They can also treat spinal injuries such as a displaced disc or a fracture, as well as disc degeneration and narrowing that occurs due to aging.
    However, when your injury or condition affects the spinal canal or spinal cord, it’s typically better to consult with a neurosurgeon. It's worth noting that, while they're both referred to as surgeons, they can also recommend treatments that don't require an operation, such as non-surgical decompression therapy.

  • Allergy and Immunology

    An allergy & immunology specialist is a physician who is specially trained in matters pertaining to chronic and acute allergies, as well as deficiencies of the immune system. The doctor will determine whether an allergy, which attacks our immune system, is present. They'll also determine the cause, whether it be environmental triggers like trees and pollen, food-borne like peanuts and dairy, the venom of insects like bees, or a medication like penicillin.
    In addition to determining the allergen causing an immunological response in a patient, the specialist will treat the symptoms caused by the reaction.

  • Education

    Affiliated doctors have gone to the following schools

  • Jefferson Medical College Of Thomas Jefferson University
  • University Of Pennsylvania School Of Medicine
  • Temple University School Of Medicine
  • New York University School Of Medicine
  • State University Of New York Downstate Medical Center College Of Medicine
  • Yale University School Of Medicine
  • Mount Sinai School Of Medicine Of New York University
  • Northwestern University The Feinberg School Of Medicine
  • University Of Louisville School Of Medicine
  • Case Western Reserve University School Of Medicine
  • Weill Cornell Medical College
  • University Of Virginia School Of Medicine
  • Drexel University College Of Medicine
  • Nearby Group Practices

    Abington Medical Specialists is similar to the following 3 Group Pracices near Abington, PA.

  • Abington Pulmonary & Critical Care Associates

    Group Practice

    Abington, PA

  • Palliative Medicine Associates

    Group Practice

    Abington, PA

  • Urology Health Specialists

    Group Practice

    Abington, PA

Information About Group Practices

What is a Group Practice?

According to The Medical Group Management Association, a group practice is any relationship between three or more physicians who share facilities, expenses, profits and other resources like support staff and equipment. Group practices tend to fall into two categories: those that organize around a particular medical specialty and those that encompass several specialties like East Boston Neighborhood Health that specializes in internal medicine

Why Group Practice?

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.

Benefits of Group Practice

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.